My ADSB in solution

Constructive topics of interest related to aviation that do not match the other section descriptions below (as long as it is somewhat related to aviation, flying, learning to fly, sport pilot, light sport aircraft, etc.). Please, advertisements for Viagra will be promptly deleted!"

Moderator: drseti

User avatar
ShawnM
Posts: 561
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2017 9:59 pm
Location: Clearwater, FL / KZPH

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby ShawnM » Thu Aug 15, 2019 10:43 pm

proemer wrote:Answering my own question, looks like they are not "slide in" swappable...

Pete


You did answer you own question. The 330 has a high density 62 pin DB connector and the 327 has a standard density 25 pin DB connector. All is not lost though. I'm betting you are not utilizing anywhere near all the functions of the 330 if you dont have a WAAS position source or a Garmin navigator. It'll still be a pretty simple wiring change. You can get anywhere from $800 to $900 for the 330 depending on condition.

I have the GDL-82 and a 327 and it works flawlessly. I did upgrade my transponder antenna to a Rami AV-74 blade antenna with new RG-400 cable.

rgstubbsjr
Posts: 105
Joined: Fri May 02, 2014 5:54 pm
Location: GBR - Great Barrington, MA

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby rgstubbsjr » Wed Aug 28, 2019 5:57 pm

Tres cool.

User avatar
bryancobb
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 12:35 pm
Location: Cartersville Georgia

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby bryancobb » Sun Sep 15, 2019 9:55 am

I don't know how many folks on the forum fall as short on perceptiveness ...

...Somewhere on line, someone opened my eyes about ADS-B. Maybe this will help someone like it helped me. I'm presenting this as I understand it so I may be mixed up. Please correct me if you think I am wrong.

The central thesis of ADS-B is "FAA Is Quickly ELIMINATING Antiquated, Inadequate Aircraft Tracking System."

The secondary sub-title would be "A highly efficient, feature-rich, nationwide satellite network is quickly replacing RADAR and
will provide ATC and pilots very accurate, position and altitude information on every participating aircraft in the air."

As of JAN 1, 2020 every aircraft that flies in America will be **REQUIRED to have equipment that will transmit their precise location
and altitude...OUT...to that network, without using RADAR.

** Well, if you fly in airspace that has not required a transponder at all, you won't have to play along. If there has never been reliable RADAR coverage, the FAA categorized that as "UNCONTROLLED" airspace. Most airspace below 700' AGL has been uncontrolled (Class G) for a lonnnng time. If your Sectional Chart has had a "bluish" color all over for eons, RADAR could see you down to 1200' AGL. there. Around most airports, there's a magenta area that has a "fuzzy" side toward the airport. Within that area, RADAR can reach downward to 700' AGL. In a limited few areas, RADAR can see you all the way to the surface and this is called "Surface Area Class E." Having reliable RADAR is what has historically made airspace "controlled" and has made a 4096 Transponder mandatory. Mode C Altitude capability was made mandatory around 1986 or 87 if you wanted to enter Class B or C.

If your Sectional Chart hasn't had that bluish tint and instead has had a yellowish-tan color, the FAA could not see you on RADAR at all because they did't have it there. All that airspace, all the way up to FL180 was uncontrolled and the only way the FAA knew where you were, is if you told them and/or gave them information over the COMM about where you are, where you are headed, and how long you expect it to take you to get there.

If you are flying IFR in uncontrolled airspace, ALL fixes and waypoints are Compulsory Reporting Points and you MUST tell them when you get there. You could literally be in the clouds with many other aircraft and no one would know exactly where EXCEPT YOU and the people who hear you say your location over the radio airwaves.

Now, after ADS-B OUT becomes mandatory in 2020, your PRECISE LOCATION AND ALTITUDE will be known on the network no matter how low you are, because satellite network receivers are not limited by mountains or terrain like ground-based RADAR was. Line of sight no longer limits ATC. ADS-B equipment (A Transponder, A WAAS Capable GPS, and a passive Network Transmitter) will send your precise information to the network satellites every fraction of a second so the network has very accurate data on every aircraft playing along.

Only legal aircraft getting around in UNCONTROLLED AIRSPACE, legal ULTRALIGHTS, and ILLEGAL AIRCRAFT will not show up on the network in their precise location and altitude. THIS CONSTITUTES ADS-B OUT.

Now...Just imagine all the useful stuff on the internet that would be extremely useful to pilots if instantly available in real-time. THESE THINGS CONSTITUTE ADS-B IN. If the FAA allows the information to be on the ADS-B satellite network, pilots can access it in their cockpit while airborne. They just need the equipment with those capabilities. ADS-B In IS NOT MANDATORY on JAN 1, 2020, ADS-B OUT is.

This is a fast transition to ABSOLUTE FREE-FLIGHT that is taking place. Soon, all airways will be eliminated. All VOR/VORTAC/TACAN's will go bye-bye. No more ILS's ... No NDB's... No Outer/Middle/Inner Markers! Just imagine, every aircraft will have a "windows-in-the-sky" (a-la Microsoft FlightSim, thanks Bruce Artwick) display that presents them a curving path into and out of airports without procedure turns or airport traffic patterns. Separation distances can be decreased a LOT! Capacity of the airspace will increase tremendously. Mid-air collisions will almost be non-existent. Every pilot will know accurately, where each aircraft near them is. Avoiding each other will be easy. Eventually the two pilots will automatically be able to talk or "voice synthesized chat" directly to each other over the network, without anyone else hearing.

IT IS TRULY AMAZING what ADS-B will lead to, how much money it will save on NAVAID and RADAR maintenance, and how much safer flying will be.
Bryan Cobb
Sport Pilot CFI
Commercial/Instrument Airplane
Commercial Rotorcraft Helicopter
Manufacturing Engineer II, Meggitt Airframe Systems, Fuel Systems & Composites Group
Cartersville, Ga
bryandcobb@att.net

TimTaylor
Posts: 1520
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:17 pm

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby TimTaylor » Sun Sep 15, 2019 11:13 am

Beginning 1/1/2020 ADS-B OUT will be required in Class A, B, and C airspace and within the 30nm veil around certain Class B. It will also be required flying above Class B and C and in Class E above 10,000 MSL if above 2500 AGL, and the Gulf Of Mexico. If your aircraft was certified without an electrical system, then ADS-B OUT is not required. Anyway, that's basically it unless I missed something that someone will surly correct.
Commercial Pilot Airplane Single & Multiengine Land; Instrument Airplane
Sport Endorsement Airplane Single Engine Sea
Flight Instructor Airplane Single & Multiengine
Ground Instructor Advanced Instrument
BS Engineering NC State
MBA Wisconsin

User avatar
drseti
Posts: 6376
Joined: Sat Nov 28, 2009 6:42 pm
Location: Lock Haven PA
Contact:

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby drseti » Sun Sep 15, 2019 11:41 am

TimTaylor wrote:within the 30nm veil around certain Class B.


I thought the 30 nm veil now existed around all class B.
The opinions posted are those of one CFI, and do not necessarily represent the FAA or its lawyers.
Prof H Paul Shuch
PhD CFII DPE LSRM-A/GL/WS/PPC iRMT
AvSport LLC, KLHV
fly@AvSport.org
AvSport.org
facebook.com/SportFlying
SportPilotExaminer.US

TimTaylor
Posts: 1520
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:17 pm

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby TimTaylor » Sun Sep 15, 2019 11:59 am

drseti wrote:
TimTaylor wrote:within the 30nm veil around certain Class B.


I thought the 30 nm veil now existed around all class B.

It might, IDK.
Commercial Pilot Airplane Single & Multiengine Land; Instrument Airplane
Sport Endorsement Airplane Single Engine Sea
Flight Instructor Airplane Single & Multiengine
Ground Instructor Advanced Instrument
BS Engineering NC State
MBA Wisconsin

3Dreaming
Posts: 2639
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:13 pm
Location: noble, IL USA

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby 3Dreaming » Sun Sep 15, 2019 4:49 pm

Class E airspace starts at 1200 AGL most places. It is typically lowered to 700 AGL at airports with an instrument approach procedure. They are trying to protect the airspace for IFR traffic.

The altitudes of the airspace have absolutely nothing to do with radar coverage.

Our little airport is in class G airspace. we have an instrument approach, so the class E transition brings the class E down to 700 AGL over our airport. The class E airspace in the area surrounding the transition is 1200 AGL. For us radar coverage doesn't start until about 3500 to 4000 feet MSL or 3000 to 3500 feet above the ground.

TimTaylor
Posts: 1520
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:17 pm

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby TimTaylor » Sun Sep 15, 2019 5:12 pm

And some have Class E to the surface depicted on the VFR chart by dashed lines around the airspace. That's to prevent the 1 mile, clear of clouds, VFR traffic from interfering with IFR traffic making an IFR approach to the airport.
Commercial Pilot Airplane Single & Multiengine Land; Instrument Airplane
Sport Endorsement Airplane Single Engine Sea
Flight Instructor Airplane Single & Multiengine
Ground Instructor Advanced Instrument
BS Engineering NC State
MBA Wisconsin

3Dreaming
Posts: 2639
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:13 pm
Location: noble, IL USA

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby 3Dreaming » Sun Sep 15, 2019 6:59 pm

TimTaylor wrote:And some have Class E to the surface depicted on the VFR chart by dashed lines around the airspace. That's to prevent the 1 mile, clear of clouds, VFR traffic from interfering with IFR traffic making an IFR approach to the airport.


And you still may not have good radar coverage in the class E airspace to the surface.

User avatar
bryancobb
Posts: 459
Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 12:35 pm
Location: Cartersville Georgia

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby bryancobb » Sun Sep 15, 2019 7:02 pm

3Dreaming wrote:
TimTaylor wrote:And some have Class E to the surface depicted on the VFR chart by dashed lines around the airspace. That's to prevent the 1 mile, clear of clouds, VFR traffic from interfering with IFR traffic making an IFR approach to the airport.


And you still may not have good radar coverage in the class E airspace to the surface.


Every Surface Area Class E that I have looked at was at an airport where a Flight Service Station is. I think FSS's have airport surveillance radar (ASR) if I'm not mistaken.
Bryan Cobb
Sport Pilot CFI
Commercial/Instrument Airplane
Commercial Rotorcraft Helicopter
Manufacturing Engineer II, Meggitt Airframe Systems, Fuel Systems & Composites Group
Cartersville, Ga
bryandcobb@att.net

3Dreaming
Posts: 2639
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:13 pm
Location: noble, IL USA

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby 3Dreaming » Sun Sep 15, 2019 8:59 pm

bryancobb wrote:
3Dreaming wrote:
TimTaylor wrote:And some have Class E to the surface depicted on the VFR chart by dashed lines around the airspace. That's to prevent the 1 mile, clear of clouds, VFR traffic from interfering with IFR traffic making an IFR approach to the airport.


And you still may not have good radar coverage in the class E airspace to the surface.


Every Surface Area Class E that I have looked at was at an airport where a Flight Service Station is. I think FSS's have airport surveillance radar (ASR) if I'm not mistaken.


The class E to the surface is generally at airports that have a higher level of IFR traffic, and maybe some larger commercial flights. Some of those airports may have or had a flight service station, but not all did. We have one near here (KMVN) that has class E to the surface, but it has never had a flight service station. I don't think they have radar service to the ground.

TimTaylor
Posts: 1520
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2017 7:17 pm

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby TimTaylor » Mon Sep 16, 2019 12:41 am

3Dreaming wrote:
TimTaylor wrote:And some have Class E to the surface depicted on the VFR chart by dashed lines around the airspace. That's to prevent the 1 mile, clear of clouds, VFR traffic from interfering with IFR traffic making an IFR approach to the airport.


And you still may not have good radar coverage in the class E airspace to the surface.

I don't think it has anything to do with radar service. It has to do with giving IFR traffic more protection from VFR in marginal weather. Class G airports might have VFR flying around with 1 mile visibility and clear of clouds. The increased protection for IFR traffic seems more appropriate when there is no radar coverage.
Commercial Pilot Airplane Single & Multiengine Land; Instrument Airplane
Sport Endorsement Airplane Single Engine Sea
Flight Instructor Airplane Single & Multiengine
Ground Instructor Advanced Instrument
BS Engineering NC State
MBA Wisconsin

3Dreaming
Posts: 2639
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:13 pm
Location: noble, IL USA

Re: My ADSB in solution

Postby 3Dreaming » Mon Sep 16, 2019 8:19 am

TimTaylor wrote:
3Dreaming wrote:
TimTaylor wrote:And some have Class E to the surface depicted on the VFR chart by dashed lines around the airspace. That's to prevent the 1 mile, clear of clouds, VFR traffic from interfering with IFR traffic making an IFR approach to the airport.


And you still may not have good radar coverage in the class E airspace to the surface.

I don't think it has anything to do with radar service. It has to do with giving IFR traffic more protection from VFR in marginal weather. Class G airports might have VFR flying around with 1 mile visibility and clear of clouds. The increased protection for IFR traffic seems more appropriate when there is no radar coverage.


Exactly! That is why I said, "They are trying to protect the airspace for IFR traffic.", in one of my above post.


Return to “Hangar Talk”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 27 guests