Transitioning to a C162

Talk about airplanes! At last count, there are 39 (and growing) FAA certificated S-LSA (special light sport aircraft). These are factory-built ready to fly airplanes. If you can't afford a factory-built LSA, consider buying an E-LSA kit (experimental LSA - up to 99% complete).

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stevem
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 12:01 pm
Location: Arkansas

Re: Transitioning to a C162

Postby stevem » Tue Feb 04, 2020 12:00 am

AviatorCrafty wrote:
stevem wrote:I have owned a Skycatcher for about 7 years. Before I purchased the plane, I got the King Schools Flying the Skycatchertransition course. https://www.kingschools.com/aviation-co ... skycatcher The course was very helpful and covered the basic G300 functions and training flight maneuvers. However, nothing beats sitting in the plane and getting acclimated. Be sure to use the ground power receptacle when getting familiar with the avionics or you can run the battery down. Download the POH, checklist, Garmin SL-40, Garmin GTX-327, and the PM3000 intercom manuals for review. I wish you well. The Skycatcher is an enjoyable aircraft to fly


I've been curious, what's it like owning a 162? I trained in one and sadly couldn't enjoy it after my checkride as my school sold theirs three days after my checkride. I understand it doesn't get much support from Cessna so what is it like maintaining it? I came to love the 162 and its little quirks despite other people saying its terrible, I felt like it was kind of misunderstood since my instructor and I loved flying it. Apart from the not-so-great useful load I wouldn't mind owning one on day and I know there are much better LSAs out there but the 162 would fit my mission were I planning to get one, and the G300 is a great avionics platform as well, plus the 162 is just plain sporty and fun to fly.

stevem
Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2012 12:01 pm
Location: Arkansas

Re: Transitioning to a C162

Postby stevem » Tue Feb 04, 2020 12:18 am

My reply did not make the last post, so here it is. The 162 has been an easy aircraft to maintain. My local A&P has no issues working on it. The O-200-D may be a dinosaur but it is rock solid. I have had a couple of avionics issues: the GSU 73 AHARS has failed twice and the GPS/com antenna needed to be replaced. My local avionics shop worked with Garmin to resolve those issues. I have not needed any support from Cessna except for ADS-B. Multiple requests for a LOA were ignored. The Sevice bulletin finally came out In July and was only for an out solution. Still no response from Cessna regarding an integrated ADS-B in. At some point I will convert it to an E-LSA and then Cessna will be out of the picture. It is a tough plane and withstands the training environment without any issues as long as no one walks into the prop. https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.avia ... 116&akey=1 Thankfully the club member survived. The engine was replaced with a factory new engine, so I have about 1900 hrs on the airframe and 400 on the engine.

ryoder
Posts: 32
Joined: Wed May 24, 2017 8:02 pm

Re: Transitioning to a C162

Postby ryoder » Fri Feb 14, 2020 6:45 pm

Super easy to maintain and annual. Excellent visibility and bright large dual glass panels. Simple and functional Garmin audio panel and com. Sturdy and simple landing gear. Simple flaps. Cool and spacious inside. Lots of room for baggage. Tons of extra power to get off the ground fast even at gross.
The fact that you can’t upgrade the panel means you won’t spend money upgrading the panel. My MFD died and it was 375 to replace. I did it myself.


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